Monthly Archives: August 2019

Unmanned US frigates to stalk submarines w Video

first_img Citation: Unmanned U.S. frigates to stalk submarines (w/ Video) (2010, February 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-02-unmanned-frigates-stalk-submarines-video.html (PhysOrg.com) — In the U.S. the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is planning to introduce unmanned frigates for long missions shadowing diesel-electric submarines. The vessels, dubbed Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessels or ACTUVs, are designed to be unmanned, with only intermittent communication from operators on shore or on a ship, and to require no maintenance for months. They will also obey navigational rules and be able to avoid collisions at sea.The three main objectives of the program are to build an “X-ship” that operates without anyone stepping aboard at any point in its operating cycle, secondly to demonstrate the technical viability of the system under “sparse remote supervisory control”, and thirdly to demonstrate the anti-submarine capability of the vessel and its “novel suite of sensors”. The ACTUV is unlike other unmanned vessels in that it is designed for global, independent deployment for months at a time.Proponents claim crewless vessels would save the U.S. Navy money and free the expensive crewed ships from the routine work of continuously cruising the oceans shadowing submarines. The unmanned frigates would locate a submarine by “pinging’ with active sonar to detect the submarine’s echoes, which means those on the submarine would know they have been detected. While nuclear submarines may be fast enough to escape the stalking frigate, fast and quiet diesel-electric submarines would not. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further More information: FBO announcement (pdf)center_img Two Boeing X-45A Unmanned Jets Continue Coordinated Flights Other unmanned vessels are already in use, with Israel deploying Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs), mainly for surveillance purposes, and the U.S. Navy deploying unmanned drones from its submarines.DARPA is the research and development section of the U.S. Department of Defense, which is charged with the job of maintaining the U.S. military’s technological superiority and avoiding technological surprises that could threaten the nation’s security. It will host an unclassified “Industry Day” conference on the ACTUV program at the Liberty Conference Center in Arlington, Virginia on February 16 to discuss the program and address any questions. U.S. Navy combat ship Freedom (LCS 1). This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Study analyzes role of mobile software in the future Internet

first_img Explore further One method for advancing network services in the future Internet consists of combining mobile agents with an evolutionary framework. In these methods, the mobile agents must decide for themselves the best course of action to take in order to handle users’ requests most effectively, with the results of the decision impacting their survival. Currently, these methods are far from being practically implemented since they lack a basic theory of the migration behaviors of mobile agents on a large scale. In a new study, Yongsheng Ding and Lei Gao from Donghua University in Shanghai, China, have performed a macrodynamics analysis of mobile agents’ migration behaviors, which could provide a fundamental basis for the development of a more ubiquitous future Internet. Their study will appear in a future issue of IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics – Part A: Systems and Humans.“We think the work is significant in being the first to conduct the macroanalysis of large-scale mobile agent migrations,” Gao told PhysOrg.com. “The study not only favors the design of composite services in a type of self-organizing network architecture, but also benefits the future deployment of an Internet-scale mobile agent system that holds myriads, hosts, and migratory movements of mobile agents.”Previous studies have predicted that the future Internet will have vast numbers of these mobile agents that can effectively handle users’ requests. As Gao explains, mobile agents could have significant advantages compared with stationary agents, especially for mobile devices.“Due to the resource limitation of mobile devices, agents are sent to some nodes/devices with rich resources for doing some tasks that have high requirements for resources, and then they bring the results back,” Gao explained. “Mobile agents can automatically suspend their executions on one host and migrate to another to resume their computations without tedious and slow network communication.”As the researchers explain in their study, mobile agents can be considered in terms of an evolutionary framework: When a mobile agent performs a service, it gains a reward. The more rewards a mobile agent has, the longer it survives, while agents that run out of rewards die. So mobile agents evolve and become more effective at handling users’ requests. They have several abilities to maximize their usefulness, such as adapting to changing environments, manipulating objects, and learning from past experiences. They also have the ability to replicate themselves individually or reproduce “children agents” with other mobile agents. T-Mobile and Samsung revealed the Galaxy S 4G More information: Yongsheng Ding and Lei Gao. “Macrodynamics Analysis of Migration Behaviors in Large-Scale Mobile Agent Systems for the Future Internet.” IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics – Part A: Systems and Humans. To be published. Citation: Study analyzes role of mobile software in the future Internet (2011, March 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-03-role-mobile-software-future-internet.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. (PhysOrg.com) — Although it’s difficult to predict what the future Internet will look like, it’s probably safe to say that certain trends we’ve seen during the past decade will continue. This means that the Internet will become further integrated into our daily lives, becoming more ubiquitous, available, autonomous, and mobile. The engineers who are guiding the Internet in this direction are doing so by developing mobile agents, which are pieces of software that can autonomously migrate from one computer to another and interact with each other. In the researchers’ model, mobile agents that perform the same or similar services (e.g., performing a credit card transaction or providing GPS data) would form a community, or “niche.” In these niches, mobile agents can learn from their surrounding environment, improve their performance, and gain more rewards. Depending on user demand, these niches can grow or shrink. The researchers’ model shows that the number of mobile agents in all niches eventually stabilizes, so that the average growth rate of the total mobile agent population reaches zero. By understanding the macroproperties that emerge from the behaviors of a large number of autonomous mobile agents, the researchers hope that they can design improved network services with more advanced features. This kind of modeling is still in its infancy, and the researchers hope to continue improving these models, and eventually apply them in the future Internet.“We believe the future Internet will be hundreds of times faster than the current one,” Gao said. “We envision the future Internet as a global integrated platform for communication, education, entertainment, business, and other human activities. Network services are required to be highly available, ubiquitous, highly secure, self-managing, and adaptable to dynamic network environments and user requirements. The characteristics of the future Internet we envision resemble the self-organizing and the self-healing properties of natural ecosystems that have evolved over billions of years. The harmonious properties of natural ecosystems have shown us a promising way to build the future integrated platform.”last_img read more

ArduSat1 and ArduSatX CubeSats launched into space

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: ArduSat-1 and ArduSat-X CubeSats launched into space (2013, August 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-ardusat-ardusat-x-cubesats-space.html (Phys.org) —Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has successfully launched an H-2B cargo rocket into space—a portion of which is bound for a rendezvous with the International Space Station. After it docks, two CubeSats—ArduSat-1 and ArduSat-X—held in its cargo module will be deployed into an orbit above the Earth. Talking humanoid robot launches on Japan rocket © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img The two tiny cube-shaped satellites will be pulled from the same cargo module that holds Kirobo—a talking humanoid type robot designed to study whether astronauts might benefit from an electronic companion. The small satellites usher in a new low cost era in space technology—each will offer the possibility of non-professionals running real-time experiments aboard a real orbiting satellite.Both of the miniature satellites are loaded with technology, including cameras, ozone and CO2 sensors, a Geiger counter and temperature gauges. They also have an onboard computer running Arduino, an open-source platform that allows for controlling instruments aboard the craft. Arduino was chosen because it is an already established platform used by educational institutions and hobbyists alike.Both craft have a set list of objectives to fulfill before time runs out—both will plummet to the Earth at some point in time between three and seven months. Once its initial objectives have been fulfilled, the satellite will be made available to other projects run by customers on the ground. $125 will get a user three days worth of satellite time while $250 will get a whole week. Since each satellite is capable of running 16 experiments simultaneously, there will be plenty of opportunities for schools and other organizations to take advantage of this unique opportunity.Shortly after docking with the ISS, ArduSat-1 and ArduSat-X will be pulled from the cargo module by a robotic arm which will then release them into space. The two CubeSats were partly built in Australia and were also partly funded via a Kickstarter project. The aerospace company responsible for their creation is Nanosatisfi LLC—their stated goal is to “democratize access to space.” They deployment of the two CubeSats is just the beginning they have told reporters. They hope to send up hundreds or even thousands of tiny satellites allowing almost anyone with a desire to perform experiments in space, a platform for doing so. Explore further CAD Drawing of ArduSat. Credit: Peter Platzer / Wikipedia.last_img read more

Two for the price of one Singlemolecule microscopy simultaneously monitors protein structure

first_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Single-molecule resolution of protein structure and interfacial dynamics on biomaterial surfaces, PNAS November 26, 2013 vol. 110 no. 48 19396-19401, doi:10.1073/pnas.1311761110 Moreover, Kaar continues, monitoring molecule-by-molecule structure changes in organophosphorus hydrolase had its own challenges related to eliminating mislabeled protein molecules – that is, molecules with other than one donor and one acceptor fluorophore – from analysis. “We met this challenge by creating and implementing filters during data analysis that separated signals from properly labeled and mislabeled species.”Kaar points out that using SM-FRET tracking had its own issue. For one, it required high-throughput tracking algorithms (developed by co-authors Kastantin and Schwartz) critical to monitor changes in FRET signals for large numbers of molecules, which in turn was essential to identifying protein structure changes accurately (that is, with high statistical confidence). He points out that SM-FRET also required prior knowledge of the crystal structure of OPH, which was needed to make the FRET signal indicative of quantitative changes in protein conformation.The study’s results suggest that surfaces may act as a source of unfolded (that is, aggregation-prone) protein back into solution – but validating this implication faces the challenge of identifying the conformation of protein molecules immediately before desorption from the surface. “The question of whether the unfolded proteins induced aggregation in solution after desorption remains to be fully understood,” Kaar explains. “Fully understanding if this is actually the case requires further analysis of protein in solution in the presence of the surface.”The team leveraged two key innovations to address these research challenges – the implementation of site-specific labeling methods, and high-throughput tracking algorithms with SM-FRET. “Combining these methods enabled the decoupling of surface-induced conformational changes from protein adsorption and desorption events,” Kaar notes. “By decoupling such phenomenon, this approach allowed us to overcome the limitations of conventional surface characterization methods.”The research also shows that SM-FRET permits a unique level of understanding of the ways in which surface chemistry influences molecular conformation and, in turn, function. “By observing molecular-level changes in protein structure in isolation from competing surface dynamics, it’s easier to make a direct connection between surface chemistry and conformation,” Kaar points out. “Therefore, it is more straightforward to see the effects of surface chemistry and can lead to new ideas for how to improve chemistry for a given application.Another important finding is that the new method will enable the creation of surfaces and modifications with improved biocompatibility by uncovering the connection between surface properties and protein unfolding. “This connection is critical to inspiring and developing surfaces and modifications that meld with the biological world,” Kaar explains. “For example, with this understanding, we can begin to design surfaces that promote protein folding and therefore favorable responses from cells present in the surrounding milieu. In this example, the folded state of the protein may display certain biological signals to cells that thwart unwanted inflammatory or harmful reactions while instructing cells to respond in ways that may facilitate proliferation, differentiation or even wound healing in vivo.”Kaar tells Phys.org that future experiments are aimed at determining if the observed effects of fused silica on organophosphorus hydrolase are general or specific to this combination of surface and protein. “We plan to address this question by probing how fused silica and surfaces with other properties impact the folding of other proteins. We’re also interested in expanding our methods to understand how surface effects on conformation impact the binding of a third protein species. Understanding this impact is critical to, for example, enumerating how cells respond to biological cues on surfaces in physiological environments.” Other innovations that the researchers may develop, Kaar adds, include more sophisticated labeling to minimize SM-FRET protein mislabeling on surfaces, as well as labeling and detection schemes to enable multiple molecular events, including unfolding and binding, to be monitored simultaneously.”Given that the interaction of proteins and surfaces are relevant in virtually all areas of biotechnology,” Kaar notes, “many other areas of research – for example, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, biosensing, biocatalysis, and pharmaceutical protein formulation – may benefit from exploiting our approach.” (Phys.org) —Proteins accomplish something rather amazing: A protein can have many functions, with a given function being determined by the way they fold into a specific three-dimensional geometry, or conformations. Moreover, the structural transitions form one conformation to another is reversible. However, while these dynamics affect protein conformation and therefore function, and so are critical to a wide range of areas, methods for understanding how proteins behave near surfaces, which is complicated by protein and surface heterogeneities, has remained elusive. Recently, however, scientists at University of Colorado utilized a method known as Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (SM-FRET) tracking to monitor dynamic changes in protein structure and interfacial behavior on surfaces by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, allowing them to explicate changes in protein structure at the single-molecule level. (SM-FRET describes energy transfer between two chromophores – molecular components that determine its color.) In addition, the researchers state that their approach is suitable for studying virtually any protein, thereby providing a framework for developing surfaces and surface modifications with improved biocompatibility. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. Citation: Two for the price of one: Single-molecule microscopy simultaneously monitors protein structure and function (2013, December 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-price-single-molecule-microscopy-simultaneously-protein.html Protein surfaces defects act as drug targets Structure of OPH showing the position of site-specific donor and acceptor labeling. OPH is a homodimer (C2 symmetry) that consists of two (α/β)8 monomers. The position K175, which was replaced with AzF in monomers A and B of OPH, is highlighted (yellow). Credit: Copyright © PNAS, doi:10.1073/pnas.1311761110 Prof. Joel L. Kaar discussed the paper he and his co-authors, Dr. Sean Yu McLoughlin, Prof. Mark Kastantin and Prof. Daniel K. Schwartz, recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “The primary challenges in devising our approach to characterizing changes in protein structure were implementing a site-specific labeling method, which enabled single-molecule resolution, as well as a method to only image molecules at the solution-surface interface,” Kaar tells Phys.org. The scientists overcame the former challenge by incorporating unnatural amino acids – that is, those not among the 20 so-called standard amino acids – with unique functional groups for labeling with fluorophores (chemical compounds that can re-emit light upon light excitation); the latter, by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, which only excites molecules in the near-surface environment, thereby minimizing the background fluorescence of molecules free in solution. “Although site-specific labeling methods have been used to monitor changes in protein conformation mainly in bulk solution, such techniques have not previously been exploited to study freely diffusible protein molecules at interfaces,” Kaar adds. As such, the researchers are the first to apply site-specific labeling methods to study protein-surface interactions,”The major challenge associated with incorporating unnatural amino acids for labeling was related to the optimization of protein expression,” Kaar continues. Specifically, he explains, the expression of the enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) – which is notoriously difficult to make in large quantities due to inclusion body formation – with the unnatural amino acid p-azido-L-Phe (AzF) had to be optimized to efficiently incorporate p-azido-L-Phe. (Inclusion body formation refers to the intracellular aggregation of partially folded expressed proteins,) “This process required modification of expression conditions,” he adds, “in which bacteria with modified genetic machinery were grown to enable production of soluble enzyme for single-molecule experiments.”last_img read more

Researchers build a map of sites where genetic information is swapped between

first_img Study maps hotspots of genetic rearrangement In order to reproduce, the human body must first make either sperm in males or eggs in females and to do that, it must somehow create cells that have just half of that individual’s DNA—the other half will come from the other person during conception. The process by which this occurs is called homologous recombination, where diploid cells undergo cell division resulting in the production of gamete cells. The process is initiated when the body forms breaks in DNA double-strands. It’s in the repair of these breaks that exchanges between chromosomes occur. Recombination occurs at specific sites along chromosomes that are known as hot spots. Finding these hot spots has proved challenging, but now, the researchers with this latest effort report that they have succeeded in creating map of such hot spots which not only allows for looking at how evolution works in new ways, but could prove to be very helpful in better understanding, and possibly treating, some genetic diseases.In their study, the researchers were able to detect the triggers inside the body that led to recombination occurring in human male volunteers—that allowed them to create the maps which show where the recombination events occur. Just looking at the maps, the team notes, allows for a better understanding of the recombination process. One preliminary finding, for example, was that hotspots can be influenced by proteins expressed by a specific gene. de Massy notes that the maps created by the team could very well be used in other mammal species as well, which could help researchers studying how genetic diseases come about better understand where things go wrong, and perhaps, shine a light on possible ways to prevent it from happening. DNA damage resulting in multiple broken chromosomes. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 More information: Recombination initiation maps of individual human genomes, Science 14 November 2014: Vol. 346 no. 6211. DOI: 10.1126/science.1256442ABSTRACTDNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in meiosis to initiate recombination and generate crossovers, the reciprocal exchanges of genetic material between parental chromosomes. Here, we present high-resolution maps of meiotic DSBs in individual human genomes. Comparing DSB maps between individuals shows that along with DNA binding by PRDM9, additional factors may dictate the efficiency of DSB formation. We find evidence for both GC-biased gene conversion and mutagenesis around meiotic DSB hotspots, while frequent colocalization of DSB hotspots with chromosome rearrangement breakpoints implicates the aberrant repair of meiotic DSBs in genomic disorders. Furthermore, our data indicate that DSB frequency is a major determinant of crossover rate. These maps provide new insights into the regulation of meiotic recombination and the impact of meiotic recombination on genome function. © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: Sciencecenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Researchers build a map of sites where genetic information is swapped between chromosomes (2014, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-sites-genetic-swapped-chromosomes.html (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers in the U.S. has built a detailed map that shows the sites where human genetic information is swapped between chromosomes. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describe their work and explain how their maps could provide new ways of looking at how such sites influence evolution and possibly genetic diseases. Bernard de Massy, of the Institute of Human Genetics offers an in depth perspective piece on the work done by the team in the same journal edition. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Polling caller guesses found to be useful in predicting which respondents will

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers has, by conducting two studies, found evidence that suggests untrained polling callers are able to “guess” with almost 60 percent accuracy, which people they call will actually follow through on claims they have made regarding whether they will vote in an upcoming election. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Todd Rogers, with Harvard University and Leanne Brinke and Dana Carney with the University of California, describe their two studies and their assessment of possible signals given by respondents that potentially serve as cues to polling callers that give away their true intent. Explore further Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More information: Unacquainted callers can predict which citizens will vote over and above citizens’ stated self-predictions Todd Rogers, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1525688113 , http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/05/18/1525688113AbstractPeople are regularly asked to report on their likelihoods of carrying out consequential future behaviors, including complying with medical advice, completing educational assignments, and voting in upcoming elections. Despite these stated self-predictions being notoriously unreliable, they are used to inform many strategic decisions. We report two studies examining stated self-prediction about whether citizens will vote. We find that most self-predicted voters do not actually vote despite saying they will, and that campaign callers can discern which self-predicted voters will not actually vote. In study 1 (n = 4,463), self-predicted voters rated by callers as “100% likely to vote” were 2 times more likely to actually vote than those rated unlikely to vote. Study 2 (n = 3,064) replicated this finding and further demonstrated that callers’ prediction accuracy was mediated by citizens’ nonverbal signals of uncertainty and deception. Strangers can use nonverbal signals to improve predictions of follow through on self-reported intentions—an insight of potential value for politics, medicine, and education. Some researchers in the polling business have begun to question the accuracy of current polling methods—as new tools for testing accuracy and new technology changes the social landscape, some believe that the results of polls are not very reliable and that news organizations might be reporting inaccuracies that don’t become evident until important events have passed. One such important case surrounds elections. More and more groups are seeking to discover which people will vote so that they can be targeted with ads. Oddly, despite the move to cell phones, most polls are still conducted by speaking to people on land lines, which obviously leaves very large gaps in polling. But, there is also the problem of people responding inaccurately, whether intentionally or not, when asked via an unsolicited phone call, whether they will be voting in an upcoming election. In this new effort, the researchers took a unique approach to increasing the reliability of such polls, by surveying the callers and simply asking them whether they thought a particular respondent would in fact vote regardless of which answer they had given.The researchers conducted two studies, the first involved querying callers working on a 2009 campaign in New Jersey—they simply asked each to guess which voter that said yes they would vote, would actually do so. They then compared the responses to voter records, and in so doing, found the callers were right approximately 58.5 percent of the time. Meanwhile, they also found that only 47 percent of respondents who said they were going to vote, actually did so.In the second experiment, the researchers listened to recorded calls made by pollsters speaking with respondents prior to an election in Texas in 2010—they found that cues given by respondents, such as pauses and changes in voice, were picked up by pollsters as signs that they likely would not vote despite saying they would. Interestingly, they also found that other traditional cues, such as a person sounding nervous or tense, were not a factor.center_img © 2016 Phys.org Citation: Polling caller guesses found to be useful in predicting which respondents will follow through on claims (2016, May 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-polling-caller.html Unrepresentative samples main cause of polling miss, finds Inquiry Credit: Karen Arnold/public domainlast_img read more

Safeguarding handicraft and handloom

first_imgThe President of India, Pranab Mukherjee has said that concerted and collective steps at multiple levels should be taken to safeguard handicrafts and handlooms in the long term. Speaking after presenting the National Awards, Shilp Guru Awards and Sant Kabir Awards to weavers and artisans for the year 2014 here today, the President said, ‘These (measures) could include, for example, facilitation of easier access of these sectors to credit from banks and other financial institutions and the promotion of the products of these sectors in domestic and foreign markets.’ Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The president gave away 46 national awards in handloom and handicrafts and ten Shilp Guru Awards and two Sant Kabir awards for the year 2014. Speaking about the challenges faced by weavers and craft persons the President said that the products in this sector remain vulnerable to competition from cheaper imports and machine made substitutes. These factors need to be addressed urgently, systematically and comprehensively and we must give more attention to development of capacity, skills, designs and infrastructure. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHighlighting the importance of the sector the President said that the handlooms sector in India, with 24 lakh handlooms, provides employment to about 44 lakh persons and our handicrafts sector provides employment to about 70 lakh persons. The textile sector provides largest employment opportunities next to agriculture. Between 2010 and the present, it is seen that despite the overall slowdown in the Indian economy there was a growth of 34% in exports from the handlooms sector and 126 % in the exports from the handicrafts sector. Minister of State Independent charge for Textiles, Santosh Gangwar congratulated the winners and conveyed nation’s gratitude for preserving, promoting and enriching the traditional cultural heritage of the country. He also informed about the various scheme being run by the Textiles Ministry in 12th Five Year Plan for handloom and handicrafts. ‘Main thrust of these schemes is to provide momentum through training and capacity building by integrating technology with craft and weaving techniques, which will lead to value addition in the craft as well as handloom products,’ he said.The Minister also informed of approval of two mega clusters at Guntur and Prakasam in Andhra Pradesh and Godda in Jharkhan. These clusters are in addition to previously sanctioned four mega clusters. In addition, The Ministry is supporting setting up of Raw Material Bank to facilitate easy and regular availability of certified raw material to artisans. Gangwar also highlighted the Ministry’s efforts to broaden existing marketing infrastructure so that the artisans and weavers continue to get opportunities to sell their products throughout the year without having to face the patches of lean demand.Textiles Secretary, Zohra Chatterjee reiterated Ministry’s commitment to the welfare of the artisans. She emphasized the need to popularize traditional products among the youth. She said that Setu Yozna of associating designers with handloom and handicraft cluster is bringing good results.The office of the Development Commissioner (handicrafts) and Development Commissioner (handlooms) jointly implement the scheme of Shilp Guru, Sant Kabir and National Awards for Master Weavers and Master Craftpersons.last_img read more

Pvt Engg colleges should stress on practical training

first_imgKolkata: State minister for Technical Education, Training and Skill Development Purnendu Basu urged the private engineering colleges to constantly keep pace with the technological advancement and stress on practical training. “There is no harm to think of doing business but your main aim should be to churn out qualitatively developed students who are fit for the job market. You should strive towards becoming centres of excellence to attract students from other states also. A number of private engineering colleges across the country have closed down as they have been deemed ‘substandard’ by the All India Council for Technical Education(AICTE). We have to keep this in mind and constantly strive towards upgrading curriculum as per requirement of the industry,” Basu said at the inaugural programme of the three-day Education Interface at Netaji Indoor Stadium on Saturday. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsEducation Interface is a platform that provides a plethora of opportunities for aspirants and offers pre-counselling sessions for students and guardians seeking guidance and career opportunities in the field of Medical and Engineering. “I will appeal to the organisers to make this interface tripartite from the next edition. We have students and representatives from a number of private engineering colleges. You should also involve the industry to make this education fair more successful. This will enable students to have a better idea of the stream they should take up and the requirement of the industry under one umbrella,” he added. The minister also appealed to the organisers and the private engineering colleges participating in the fair to host more such events so that students have a clear-cut idea about the stream they should take up.State Power minister Sobhandeb Chattopadhyay who attended the programme said that parents should not force a career option on their wards. “Students should not be compelled to take up higher studies at the behest of their parents. Parents should let their wards pursue a career of their own choice,” he maintained.last_img read more

Music for the soul

first_imgThe national Capital hosted a musical evening in association with Unicef to raise funds for Nepal quake victims on May 24.Bands like Beatitudes, Ghetto Children, Noida School of Rock, Techtronics, Project Rigden and others performed at the event which was held at Dzukou Tribal Kitchen, Hauz Khas Village.“Nepal has always been close to my heart and many other Nepalese like me. The only purpose of this charity is to help rebuild Nepal and support its people, who need more help with each passing day,” said event organiser Shweta Pradhan, a Nepali migrant, who now lives in India, to media persons. Pradhan, like other Nepalese living in India, was moved by the pain and suffering of her people after multiple tremors and aftershocks shook the Himalayan nation, killing over 8,000 people and leaving over 10,000 injured. The amount collected was sent to the UNICEF.last_img read more

Feluda and Byomkesh to dominate screens this Christmas

first_imgThe festival season in Kolkata is going to see a crop of new detective films in Bengali- a Byomkesh Bakshi thriller and a Feluda flick. Double Feluda is an upcoming thriller directed by acclaimed director Sandip Ray, son of the iconic film director Satyajit Ray.Occasion? Feluda was created by the acclaimed Oscar-winning director 50 years ago and son Sandip Ray’s latest Feluda film is based on this popular Bengali sleuth’s many exploits. This film also marks the comeback of veteran actor Sabyasachi Chakraborty as Feluda (after Royal Bengal Rahasya in 2011) and Saheb Bhattacharya, as his assistant Topshe.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe film is scheduled to be released in mid-December. Two stories, ‘Samaddarer Chabi’ and ‘Golokdham Rahasya’ are going to be packed in this thriller. The popular character Jatayu of other Feluda stories and films will probably be missing from these films. Just a year after hitting the silver screen with the popular Har Har Byomkesh, director Arindam Sil will be back once again with a revamped Byomkesh Bakshi – Byomkesh Pawrbo- starring Abir Chatterjee in the lead role.  Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveBased on Sharadindu Bandhopadhyay’s classic series, the cerebral Bengali sleuth Byomkesh Bakshi will be revealing his daring side as he pulls off some daredevil stunts in the Dooars forest where the story is set. A new riveting case sees Bakshi playing investigator in Santagola which has become a hub of the illegal weapons trade. The Bengal Government requests the sleuth to track down the culprits but as soon as Bakshi starts his investigation, he zeroes in on few well-known people of this city, who turn out to be possible suspects. However, he realises that these men are powerful and  he will never be able to search their warehouses and mills. In the meantime, a demented man named Amrito claims that he has seen a strange, horse-riding figure roaming around the jungle. Amrito is sent to the jungle to observe this phenomenon. The very next morning, his bullet ridden dead body is found inside the jungle. As Byomkesh delves deep into the case, a lot of well-respected men gets unmasked.Director Arindam Sil explains why going back to this particular series is important to him, “Byomkesh Bakshi is one character in Bengali literature whose depth lies in the multiple layers of his persona. Though he is a deep thinker, a ‘Satyanweshi’ yet his unflinching courage, righteous nature and dauntless spirit make him stand apart from the rest”. The key attractions of the film, says Sil, are the  beauty of the Dooars forest where the film has been extensively shot, the backdrop of the Tebhaga movement of 1948 and superb acting by an  eclectic cast, including Abir Chatterjee (Byomkesh), Sohini Sarkar, Ritwick Chakraborty, Rajatava Dutta, June Maliah, Sayantika Banerjee, Kaushik Sen and other accomplished character actors of Bengali cinema. Releasing on December 12, the film is bound to face off with the Feluda release but Sil is confident about his success, “I am my own competition. Also, if Sandip Ray is liberal enough to give me rights to making another Feluda film, I’m game”.  The film has been produced by Shree Venkatesh Films and Surinder Films while Sandip Ray’s Double Feluda has been produced by Eros International.last_img read more