Tag Archives: 上海水磨会所2019价格

WhatsApp Netflix Skype Cutting profits to Telecoms companies

first_img Recommended for you Telecommunications Commission marks 10 Years Five from TCI to represent at regional Music, Model & Talent Showcase set for Nassau Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 19 Nov 2015 – Telecomms companies in the Turks and Caicos are losing at the very least, tens of thousands of dollars due to over the top services like WhatsApp, Netflix and Skype. As the TCI Telecommunications Commission celebrates a decade of existence in the Turks and Caicos, there was a late day workshop Wednesday at the Palms Resort where talk turned to how these services are digging into the profitability of companies like LIME, Digicel and PTV.John Williams, Chairman, Telecommunications Commission: “We believe in freedom of information and yet to block such services, what would we be doing? Stopping the flow of information and so it is a difficult issue to deal with as we know that many of our operators are really hurting because of persons who are not licensed here are actually taking revenue from their area here in the islands where they are paying all of the fees and providing all of the infrastructure; so it was a discussion that was needed.”A founder of the Commission, Stuart MacPherson returned to TCI and led the panel discussion where he said he had hoped for more robust engagement on the issue, because it means these companies will have to be extremely creative if they are going to remain relevant. Stuart McPherson, Consultant: “Obviously TV, people doing streaming services and so on, especially in relatively small markets like this that is going to be a big problem for the small cable companies and so on.”It was agreed that while the change in how people communicate and are entertained will not necessarily drive these companies into extinction, MacPherson said it will alter how they make money. Related Items:John Williams, Netflix, skype, stuart macpherson, TCI Telecommunications Commission, whatsapp Cabinet Approves NEW government board members Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

NASA rover sees bewitching nightshining clouds on Mars

first_img 41 weird objects seen on Mars, explained Curiosity looked up in late May to capture these noctilucent clouds floating by. NASA/JPL-Caltech It’s just another twilight on Mars. You’re a rover, kicking back after a long day of science, gazing up at the clouds. Sometimes it’s the simple moments that are the most stunning.NASA’s Curiosity rover has been in skygazing mode lately, sending back ethereal visions of noctilucent (night shining) clouds. Curiosity team member Claire Newman highlighted the rover’s late-May sky view in a mission update on Wednesday.  Mars rovers NASA Space The night-shining clouds are beautiful, but they can also tell scientists a lot about what’s happening up above the rover, including how much water vapor there is in atmosphere. Curiosity isn’t the only NASA machine that enjoys a bit of cloud-watching. The InSight lander shared some soothing cloud images earlier in the year.  Curiosity is currently checking out a clay-rich area in the Gale Crater and recently sent back a fresh selfie. So what’s next? More science and more beautiful days on Mars. Sci-Tech 0 Post a comment Share your voice The noctilucent clouds are “so high that they’re still illuminated by the sun, even when it’s night at the surface and any lower cloud layers are already in shadow,” Newman wrote. Mars is heading into a cloudy season, making this a prime time for watching the atmosphere.Image processors Justin Cowart and Seán Doran gifted us a video version of the recent clouds that makes it feel like you’re standing on Mars. Tags See wispy clouds drift across the sky on Mars NASA’s Insight sees cloudy days on Mars, so why does it never rain? More clouds on Mars 43 Photoslast_img read more

The demise of Apples 12inch MacBook

first_img 5 Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Sarah Tew/CNET The end came quietly, slipped in with a series of back-to-school announcements about better screens and lower prices for the MacBook Air, and, uh, more Touch Bars for the MacBook Pro. No formal announcement was made in the jargon-filled press release letting us know that the entry-level Pro now features “Touch Bar and Touch ID, a True Tone Retina display and the Apple T2 Security Chip,” but a quick check online confirmed that the 12-inch MacBook had been removed from Apple’s website. And the 12-inch MacBook wasn’t alone in going to the big upstate farm where old computers allegedly roam, with free Wi-Fi and plenty of power outlets. The “classic” MacBook Air and the Touch-Bar-less MacBook Pro also exited active duty. But those are easier to let go of. The former was so outdated as to be hard to recommend, the latter is getting the higher-end features of its more-expensive cousin while keeping the same price. I’ll come right out and say it. The 12-inch MacBook was an unfairly maligned, misunderstood product. In fact, at several points since its 2015 debut, it’s been my favorite laptop. Insanely portable, very light, great 12-inch display, and a sharp look that turned coffee shop heads back when smaller-screen laptops were mostly low-end junk. In 2016, I proudly declared it “my favorite laptop” and “my top go-to machine.” I even wrote most of a 75,000-word book on its super-shallow keyboard. But I also acknowledged why a lot of people just didn’t “get” the 12-inch MacBook. “The knocks against this system — an odd-man-out, not part of either the Air or Pro MacBook lines — were numerous. Its screen was too small; the keyboard too shallow; not enough ports; no MagSafe power connection; underpowered, even compared to the base MacBook Air; and battery life that didn’t measure up to the MacBook standard.”I also said, “The 12-inch MacBook won’t do everything and isn’t for everyone. But its strictly enforced minimalism will make this laptop the model that industrial designers will strive to copy for the next several years.” And that has certainly come to pass. USB-C as the go-to standard? Check. Butterfly keyboard on every MacBook? Check (although who knows for how much longer). Higher-res, Retina-style screens as table stakes for premium laptops? Check.I recall people tearing their hair out over the single USB-C port in the first 12-inch MacBook. No USB-A, no HDMI — how could anyone use a laptop like that? Now, many super-premium 13-inch laptops have at best a couple of USB-C ports and little else. Apple Macbook 12-inch 2017Just one port.  Sarah Tew/CNET It reminds me of when Apple led the way dropping things like Ethernet jacks and optical drives from computers. The company was just a little ahead of the curve about what features were on their way out. The 12-inch MacBook didn’t physically connect to anything because many modern laptops don’t need to physically connect to anything. Between Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and cloud-connected services, I can’t recall the last time I had to plug something into a travel laptop. I was excited to get a USB memory key with dual USB-A and USB-C ports several months ago. Still haven’t taken it out of the package. If it was so great, then what killed the 12-inch MacBook? The culprit was the very system the it was originally supposed to replace. The 13-inch MacBook Air, for many years the single most universally useful laptop you could buy (and a staple for students and office workers alike), had fallen into the phantom zone where Apple sticks products that stagnate with minimal, if any, updates for years on end. But last year, the Air finally got the top-to-bottom makeover it needed and became a sales leader, leaving few reasons beyond slightly better portability to choose the 12-inch model instead. Call it natural selection or survival of the fittest, but it’s the law of the gadget jungle. And before I get too morose over the death of the 12-inch MacBook, I should remember that I’m writing this on — you guessed it — an excellent new 13-inch MacBook Air. Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier Share your voice Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Apple • Apple Tags Computers Laptops Comments See All reading • RIP 12-inch Apple MacBook, my misunderstood friend Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumorslast_img read more

Al Qaeda warns Myanmar of punishment over Rohingya crisis

first_imgA group of Rohingya refugee people walk in the water after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Teknaf. Photo: ReutersAl Qaeda militants have called for support for Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims, who are facing a security crackdown that has sent about 400,000 of them fleeing to Bangladesh, warning that Myanmar would face “punishment” for its “crimes”.The exodus of Muslim refugees from Buddhist-majority Myanmar was sparked by a fierce security force response to a series of Rohingya militant attacks on police and army posts in the country’s west on 25 August.The Islamist group behind the 11 September 2001, attacks on the Untied States issued a statement urging Muslims around the world to support their fellow Muslims in Myanmar with aid, weapons and “military support”.”The savage treatment meted out to our Muslim brothers … shall not pass without punishment,” al Qaeda said in a statement, according to the SITE monitoring group.”The government of Myanmar shall be made to taste what our Muslim brothers have tasted.”Myanmar says its security forces are engaged in a legitimate campaign against “terrorists”, whom it blames for attacks on the police and army, and on civilians.The government has warned of bomb attacks in cities, and al Qaeda’s call to arms is likely to compound those concerns.”We call upon all mujahid brothers in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and the Philippines to set out for Burma to help their Muslim brothers, and to make the necessary preparations – training and the like – to resist this oppression,” the group said.last_img read more