Tag Archives: 南京夜生活

NASA rover sees bewitching nightshining clouds on Mars

first_img 41 weird objects seen on Mars, explained Curiosity looked up in late May to capture these noctilucent clouds floating by. NASA/JPL-Caltech It’s just another twilight on Mars. You’re a rover, kicking back after a long day of science, gazing up at the clouds. Sometimes it’s the simple moments that are the most stunning.NASA’s Curiosity rover has been in skygazing mode lately, sending back ethereal visions of noctilucent (night shining) clouds. Curiosity team member Claire Newman highlighted the rover’s late-May sky view in a mission update on Wednesday.  Mars rovers NASA Space The night-shining clouds are beautiful, but they can also tell scientists a lot about what’s happening up above the rover, including how much water vapor there is in atmosphere. Curiosity isn’t the only NASA machine that enjoys a bit of cloud-watching. The InSight lander shared some soothing cloud images earlier in the year.  Curiosity is currently checking out a clay-rich area in the Gale Crater and recently sent back a fresh selfie. So what’s next? More science and more beautiful days on Mars. Sci-Tech 0 Post a comment Share your voice The noctilucent clouds are “so high that they’re still illuminated by the sun, even when it’s night at the surface and any lower cloud layers are already in shadow,” Newman wrote. Mars is heading into a cloudy season, making this a prime time for watching the atmosphere.Image processors Justin Cowart and Seán Doran gifted us a video version of the recent clouds that makes it feel like you’re standing on Mars. Tags See wispy clouds drift across the sky on Mars NASA’s Insight sees cloudy days on Mars, so why does it never rain? More clouds on Mars 43 Photoslast_img read more

Youth hacked dead

first_imgA young man was hacked to death allegedly by his gambling rivals at Shamirpur village in Karnaphuli upazila of Chattogram on Wednesday night, reports UNB.The deceased is Mamun Al-Rashid Sagor, 27, son of Abu Taher of the village.Rafiqul Islam, officer-in-charge of Karnaphuli police station, said two groups locked into an altercation over gambling and drugs.At one stage, opponent group hacked Mamun, leaving him dead on the spot. Police started drive to arrest the accused who were involved in this connection, the OC added.last_img

2 killed in protests over a girls rape and murder in Pakistan

first_imgPeople chant slogans and hold signs to condemn the rape and killing of 7-year-old girl Zainab Ansari in Kasur, during a protest in Peshawar, Pakistan. Photo: ReutersTwo civilians were killed when officers fired live rounds to disburse crowds that attacked a police station in Pakistan on Wednesday in a protest over the rape and murder of a 7-year-old girl.Police recovered the body of Zainab Ansari on Tuesday from a garbage dumpster in the town of Kasur in eastern Pakistan, four days after she was reported missing.It was the twelfth incident of a girl being adducted, raped, and killed in the past year in Kasur district, police say. Residents have been furious at the authorities for what they see as a failure to investigate such cases.The spokesman for Pakistan’s Punjab province, Malik Muhammad Ahmad Khan, told Reuters that protesters turned violent and attacked a local police office.”They started throwing stones at the office and some of armed protesters shot bullets at police. In order to stop them, police resorted to aerial firing,” Khan said, adding that two people were killed and one wounded as a result.Locals said police responded with undue force.”A peaceful protest was taking place, some students threw stones and police responded by firing at the crowd,” Saleem ur Rehman, a resident who was at the protest, told Reuters. “The law and order situation here is really bad and there have been many such incidents. That is what the protest was about.”Ansari’s parents, who were not in the country when their daughter was kidnapped, returned on Wednesday.”I want justice! I want justice!” Zainab’s mother cried, surrounded by reporters at the international airport in the capital Islamabad.Ansari’s case has attracted the attention of the country’s civilian and military leadership, with Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif calling for immediate action.Police in Kasur deny they have been lax in investigating child abductions in the town. Regional police officer Zulfiqar Hameed told Reuters that four kidnappers had been arrested and another killed during an arrest attempt.”Investigations reveal that in each case a paedophile kidnaps little girls, rapes them and kills them,” he said.The case of Ansari would soon be solved, he said: “We have got CCTV footage that shows a young man taking her along. We will catch him very soon,” he said, adding that 95 DNA samples had been taken from suspects.A number of police officials have been transferred out of the region for failing to investigate complaints of missing children since 2015, when authorities uncovered what they called a paedophile ring linked to a prominent local family. At least two people have been convicted in the case, in which authorities say hundreds of children in the district were abused.last_img read more

MHA advisory deeprooted conspiracy by BJP to grab power in oppnruled states

first_imgKolkata: The Trinamool Congress Monday wrote to Union Home Minister Amit Shah alleging that the MHA advisory to the West Bengal government is a “deep-rooted conspiracy” by the BJP and an “evil ploy to grab power” in opposition-ruled states. The BJP, however, termed the allegations baseless and claimed that the law-and-order situation in the state has completely broken down. TMC secretary general and West Bengal minister Partha Chatterjee, in a letter, claimed that the Ministry of Home Affairs has drawn conclusions without verifying the ground reality or taking a report from the state government. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata “We, on behalf of the Trinamool Congress, lodge our strong objection to the advisory issued by the MHA and urge that the same be withdrawn forthwith,” he said. In the advisory sent to the West Bengal government on Sunday, a day after BJP and TMC workers clashed in Sandeshkhali area of North Parganas district, the MHA had expressed “deep concern” over the continuing post-poll violence in the state, and asked it to maintain law and order. Criticising the advisory, Chatterjee said, “We have reason to believe that it is an evil ploy to grab power in states run by parties politically opposed to the BJP.” Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in state “Moreover, this is a deep-rooted conspiracy and game plan to malign the state government and capture the Bengal administration through undemocratic, unethical and unconstitutional means.” Blaming “BJP goons” for violence and chaos across the state, the TMC leader alleged that as the MHA and the saffron party are being headed by the same person, it is “quite obvious” that “whatever the BJP desires, the MHA is implementing it with closed eyes, throwing all constitutional propriety to the wind”. “In a democracy, the Centre and states work in tandem. Instead of taking the state government into confidence and verifying the ground situation, the unilateral issuance of an advisory by the MHA is an insult to the people of Bengal and an assault on the glory, culture, and heritage of the state,” Chatterjee said. Reacting to the TMC allegation, state BJP president Dilip Ghosh said the MHA was absolutely right in sending the advisory. “The law-and-order situation has completely broken down… The MHA has done the right thing. If the TMC is saying that the Union home minister and the BJP president are the same person, then the same rule applies in Bengal as well. “The chief minister, home minister and party supremo are the same person (in Bengal). So, does that mean all the decisions taken by the state government are politically motivated?” Ghosh said. Senior BJP leader Mukul Roy also accused the state government of not cooperating with the Centre and violating the federal structure. On Sunday night, the West Bengal government sent a letter to the MHA, saying that the situation in the state was “under control”, and there was no failure on the part of its law enforcement agencies. The BJP has claimed that five of its workers were killed in the violence in Sandeshkhali, while the ruling TMC said that one was killed.last_img read more

Rep Howell lauds Action Plans focus on skilledtrades education

first_img Categories: Howell News,News ##### State Rep. Gary Howell today joined his House colleagues in rolling out the 2017-18 House Republican Action Plan, which he says will be a blueprint for the future.Howell, of North Branch, said the Action Plan’s focus on skilled-trades training is something he has prioritized for years. As president of the Lapeer County Intermediate Board of  Education, he has long emphasized the need to train young people for vocational careers.“Job creators in Lapeer County are hiring well-trained workers for skilled-trades positions, and we must do all we can do on the state level to prepare people for those well-paying jobs,” Howell said. “At the Intermediate School District I had a role in operating the vocational-technical center, and know how important it is to train people to work in the trades.”Howell also said he is supportive of the tax relief that is emphasized in the Action Plan.“Some families in Lapeer County are still living paycheck-to-paycheck, and we in state government need to tighten our belts as well,” Howell said. “Reducing the income tax will help give those families peace of mind.”The House Action Plan can be seen here: http://gophouse.org/best-way-forward/.center_img 16Feb Rep. Howell lauds Action Plan’s focus on skilled-trades educationlast_img read more

I have a secret to share For the last 43 years I

first_imgI have a secret to share. For the last 43 years, I have been an educator—first traveling all over the world conducting training classes and now through the written word. You’ve probably heard the adage: when the student is ready to learn, the teacher shall appear. The counterpoint to that line of thinking is that you can teach all day long, but it makes little difference if the other person does not want to learn. I agree for the most part, but that doesn’t mean educators should sit around waiting for a magic teaching moment. A good educator knows it is his job to grab people’s attention. So here I sit at my computer, trying to find the magic words to motivate our readers to explore a subject that might be a little scary, but it’s also the best avenue I know of to prevent our life savings from being wiped out in either a high inflationary or a deflationary market. OK, here goes: regular people like you and me should consider internationalizing some of our assets. I hope folks don’t stop reading at the last sentence, thinking this does not apply to them. There is something about the subject of internationalization that turns off a lot of people. I hear comments like: “I’m not leaving this country. My family is here.” Or “That’s for ultra-rich people, drug dealers, and Tina Turner.” Or the one I find really frightening, “I’m keeping my money right here where it is safe and protected by the government.”The Most Powerful Thug I have quizzed many investors who have internationalized a portion of their financial assets, and there is one common line of thought among them. As a government grows, it needs to confiscate a larger portion of private wealth to support its bureaucracies. It also needs to reallocate private wealth to bribe voters and stay in power. It finds ways to “enhance revenue,” as opposed to shrinking its bloated bureaucracy. Hell, our government probably spends a few million tax dollars on a politically connected public relations firm to come up with euphemistic terms like that. Governments are parasites; they must siphon wealth from the producers to survive. For a government to siphon off wealth efficiently, it must know where the wealth is, set up ways to take it, and have a strong enough police force to make sure citizens comply. The intention is to make it easier to pay up than go to jail. Even people with modest nest eggs are constantly looking for ways to legally protect their wealth. Lawyers love it, since it means citizens need a variety of trusts and complicated legal avenues for minimizing taxes. That’s part of the game. As governments press on, the stakes escalate, taxes increase, and we have to escalate our efforts to protect ourselves. Look to New Jersey or France—which recently passed “millionaire taxes” to facilitate going after the super-wealthy. A year later both governments found that the tax revenue they received from the ultra-wealthy had dropped even though they taxed at a much higher percentage of their earnings. What happened? The wealthy moved and took their money with them. Frankly, I’m amazed that the political class seemed so surprised. Instead of more tax dollars coming in, they ended up with fewer. The next move—look for additional ways to “enhance revenue.”Thugs Steal Land Have you heard of the term “eminent domain?” It means that the government has the legal right to confiscate your property for public use. For generations, it meant that if the government was building an airport or school, it could force a property owner to sell needed land to the government. Here in the United States, the Fifth Amendment limits the federal government’s ability to exercise that right. Americans put up with eminent domain because most of us have never had to deal with it. In 2005, the Supreme Court vastly expanded when eminent domain could be used. The Kelo decision allowed a Connecticut city to take private property and transfer it to another private owner as part of the city’s comprehensive economic redevelopment plan. In short, the definition of “public use” is running wild. Just look to the suburban towns in Cook County, Illinois, where private citizens were forced to sell their old Archie Bunker-type houses to the government. Then the government re-sold them to a politically connected developer who built a large condominium complex. Why did they do that? If 20 houses are torn down and 100 condominiums are built in their place, the government increases its tax base and increases “revenue enhancement” by 400% or more. Is this really a public use, or government use?Thugs Steal Gold Additionally, the government has targeted specific assets to confiscate. President Roosevelt confiscated gold by executive order in 1933. When he issued the order, gold was $20/oz. in round numbers. He made it a criminal offense to own gold to “encourage” citizens to comply with the law and redeem their gold for paper money. The price of gold from the Treasury was then raised to $35/oz. Those people holding fresh cash from the government took a huge hit to their wealth virtually overnight. In effect, the US government legally stole wealth from the private sector with the stroke of Roosevelt’s pen. It would be foolhardy to think something like that couldn’t happen again. A recent Casey Research special report on Obamacare makes it clear that seniors may be forced to go offshore for health care that we may be denied in the US. Should my wife Jo or I need a hip replacement or a heart procedure, I don’t want any delays because I have to find a way to move money offshore to pay for the care. Better safe than sorry. We can protect our nest egg by making it more difficult for a confiscatory government to steal it. The government makes more rules, and prudent investors have to look for ways to legally work around them and protect themselves. Offshore investing offers one of the best means to do just that. Of course, the US government doesn’t make it easy. Under the guise of the Patriot Act and the war on drugs, our government has instituted a series of forms demanding that US citizens report all of their foreign assets on a regular basis. In addition, it is escalating its demands on foreign banks to share data with it even though doing so may be in violation of the laws in the local country. Because of the hassle, a lot of foreign banks are getting rid of US clients. Bingo! That’s exactly what our government wants them to do to us. The federal government is frantically escalating its efforts to identify and locate all assets belonging to US citizens all over the world. If you don’t supply the information, there are criminal penalties. It is watching—as Edward Snowden recently pointed out. And it also owns the police force—as Mr. Snowden quickly found out. Prudent people who understand the game will take steps while they still can to legally move some of their assets out of their home country, just like the people of New Jersey and France have done. The government likes to label those who do so as “selfish tax evaders” and “cheats” to discourage us from protecting ourselves. Always comply with the law. Report and pay taxes on your income, but use every legal avenue to protect your nest egg, or you could lose it.Added Benefits to Internationalization Not all of the reasons for going international are defensive. Offshore investments not only offer good investment choices that are not available in the US, they can also provide a tremendous advantage for protecting against inflation. When the dollar inflates, its buying power drops in relation to other currencies. Inside my offshore Roth IRA, I have investments denominated in eight different foreign currencies. As the value of the dollar decreases—which it has for the last 100 years—owning assets denominated in a currency that is increasing in value can offset those effects. I bought a stock on a foreign exchange that could have been bought here in the US. When I sold it for a nice gain, I realized that not only did I take a gain on the stock, I also had an additional profit due to the foreign currency increasing in value against the USD. My goal today is to help our readers understand why a lot of investors, even with smaller portfolios, are looking outside the US to protect themselves and their nest eggs. Internationalizing some of our assets is a darn good insurance policy. How many get-togethers have we had where friends expressed concern about the government and the direction the country is going? The next step in the government chess game will be instituting capital controls, like Argentina has already done. That means the amount of money citizens can take out of the country will be tightly controlled by the government. If we wait until that happens, it will be too late. While Jo and I have no plans to move out of the country—after all, our grandchildren are here—we think it’s plain old common sense to hold some of our investments internationally. In addition to good investment opportunities, we just feel safer because we are better protected from inflation, deflation, or outright confiscation. —- I decided to write this article after reading a new Casey Research special report, Going Global 2013, and quickly realizing that it applied to my readers and myself. I liked that the report covers how small investors can easily get started and discusses investments we can make even if we want to keep our money closer to home. The report also shows us how we can find and open accounts—including an IRA—all around the world, and details more sophisticated foreign trusts and legal ways for larger investors to pass their wealth down to future generations. It even offers steps we can take from our own home to store physical gold in safe jurisdictions like Singapore and Switzerland. Unlike most of the material I read on internationalization, which is written for ultra-wealthy investors (by someone who is trying to garner their business), this report is written for you and me. While most of us will never progress beyond Chapter 8, we can progress to our personal level of comfort and protect our nest egg accordingly. I’ve worked out an arrangement with the authors so you can purchase Going Global 2013and get a free three-month subscription to Money Forever. During your free three months, you’ll receive three issues, have access to all the research on the investments in our portfolio, and access to all of our special reports, like the popular monthly income plan, Money Every Month. Click here for more about Going Global 2013 and this special offer. If this sounds right up your alley, plan to check out the August issue of Money Forever—we have a terrific interview with Nick Giambruno, senior editor of International Man, lined up. Nick’s perspective only amplifies why folks like you and me should take advantage of international investing, and he answers some of the questions that may have popped into your mind as you read this article. Money Forever subscribers should look for the issue in their inboxes on Tuesday, August 20.On the Lighter Side The NFL season will soon arrive. It held its annual Hall of Fame game last week, and this weekend we have a full slate of preseason games. If you are a football fan, I urge you to add a trip to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio to your bucket list. I spent a good bit of time walking around the museum, relating childhood memories to Jo. At one time, I had Bears season tickets. It always griped me that the franchise made season ticket holders pay full price for two preseason games or they lost the right to buy the tickets for the regular games. Football, like most professional sports, may receive a rude awakening if our economy does not improve. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were Super Bowl champions a decade ago and bragged that they had 57,000 people on their season-ticket waiting list. Now they have a hard time filling their stadium, and many of their home games are blacked out locally as a result. On a happier note, I am still receiving colorful emails from our readers about their career encores. Thank you to everyone who took the time to write in. If you have ideas to share and you have not yet dropped me a line, please send your story my way. I plan to share some of your ideas in Money Weekly towards the end of the month. And finally… As long as we are focusing on the government, here are some clever political quotations provided by Courtenay W. We hang petty thieves and appoint the great thieves to public office.—Aesop, Greek slave & fable author. Politics is the gentle art of getting votes from the poor and campaign funds from the rich by promising to protect each from the other.—Oscar Ameringer, “the Mark Twain of American Socialism.” Until next week…last_img read more

GraphExeter—the bestknown roomtemperature transp

first_img GraphExeter—the best-known room-temperature transparent conductor—is a material built up of several graphene sheets with a layer of ferric chloride molecules in between each sheet. Exeter’s device converts light into electrical signals by exploiting the unique attributes of this material. Says Exeter physics professor Saverio Russo, “This new flexible and transparent photosensitive device uses graphene and graphExeter to convert light into electrical signals with efficiency comparable to that found in opaque devices based on graphene and metals.” At just a few atoms thick, it is ultra-lightweight and portable. Applications? How about photovoltaic textiles that enable your clothes to act as solar panels and charge your mobile phone while you’re walking down the street? Or an intelligent window that can both harvest electricity and display images, all while remaining transparent to the outside? “Smart clothing”—that can monitor a wide range of our functions as we go about our daily lives—is another recent development. Normally, it’s created by weaving conductive materials into fabrics. But that results in flexibility limitations, and it can only be achieved when the conductors are integrated into the design of the clothing from the start. But now, scientists at the UK’s National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have come up with a way to print silver directly onto fibers. The technique involves chemically bonding a nano‐silver layer onto individual fibers to a thickness of 20 nanometers, so that the conductive layer fully encapsulates fibers and has good adhesion and excellent conductivity. Chris Hunt, NPL’s lead researcher on the project, says: “The technique has many potential applications. One particularly exciting area is wearable sensors and antennas which could be used for monitoring, for example checking on patients and vulnerable people; data capture and feedback for soldiers in the field; and performance monitoring in sports. It offers particular benefits over the ‘weaving in’ approach, as the conductive pattern and flexibility ensures that sensors are always positioned in the same location on the body.” Or, how about having a touchscreen on your shirt sleeve? Further possibilities for printed metal inks are being pursued. Scientists at the American Chemical society have employed copper nanosheets, which are inexpensive and highly conductive, as a flexible circuit ink. They took the copper nanosheets, coated them with silver nanoparticles, and incorporated this material into an ink pen, using it to draw patterns of lines, words, and flowers on regular printer paper. Then, to show that the ink could conduct electricity, they connected a battery and lit up an LED at the drawing’s center. Courtesy Northwestern University The battery will continue to work—illuminating that LED—even when stretched, folded, twisted, or mounted on a human elbow. Power and voltage are similar to a conventional lithium-ion battery of the same size. It will stretch up to 300% of its original size with no loss of efficiency and can function for eight to nine hours before it needs recharging, which can be done wirelessly. So far, batteries—which presently power nearly all portable devices—have maintained their edge over supercapacitors for a couple of reasons. One, they’re way cheaper. And two, supercapacitors have low energy density, meaning that the amount of energy they can store per unit weight is relatively small. On the plus side, supercapacitors can be charged quickly and don’t lose their storage capabilities over time. They can literally last for millions of charge/discharge cycles without losing energy-storage capability, whereas the same process in batteries is slow and degrades their internal chemical compounds over time. Should supercapacitors overcome their deficiencies, however, they could be the wave of the future… in which case, we will need flexible ones. A group at the University of Delaware is experimenting with just such a device, using carbon nanotube macrofilms, polyurethane membranes, and organic electrolytes. Research is in the early stages, but the group says that the supercapacitor it’s developed in the lab has achieved excellent stability in preliminary testing. Meanwhile, a team of researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research in Dresden announced last year that they have created a powerful micro-supercapacitor, just nanometers thick and less than half a centimeter across. And it’s bendable. Tests on the new device showed that the tiny power supply can store more energy and provide more power per unit volume than state-of-the-art supercapacitors. Team members are now working on ways to bring down its cost. Another power source that can be harnessed is the sun, through a flexible, transparent, photosensitive device developed at the University of Exeter in England. The device converts light into electrical signals by exploiting the unique properties of two “miracle” carbon-based materials: graphene and graphExeter (developed at the eponymous university). Carbon is a unique element in that its atoms can arrange themselves in many different ways (tubes, spheres, sheets, cubes, meshes), known as allotropes. Each of them, from graphite to diamonds, has distinctive properties. As depicted below, graphene is a carbon allotrope in which the atoms are arranged in a single layer in one plane. It is the thinnest known conductive material. “C’mon Sis, quit crumpling my computer!” It may seem unlikely that those words might soon issue from a young fellow’s mouth. Yet they could, in the not-too-distant future. And it’s because of the hottest trend in consumer products today: Flexible electronics. Some stunning advances in materials technology have made possible a lot of things we never expected to see (or maybe only dreamed of). They are about to lead to a flood of everyday electronic items that you can bend, stretch, crumple, and fold (but not spindle or mutilate). This is a big, big business. One analysis projects that the global flexible electronics market will reach $13.23 billion by 2020, at an estimated CAGR of around 22%. And that’s probably conservative. There’s so much going on in this sector that it’s hard to decide where to begin. But that crumply computer is as good a jumping-off point as any. Remember the old days, when people read newspapers on the train to work, then rolled them up and stuffed the parts they weren’t finished with into their back pockets? The newspaper of the future is going to be kinda like that. Neatly rollable, adaptable to a back pocket. It’s just not going to be made of paper. A September 2013 article from Science Daily asks us to envision “an electronic display nearly as clear as a window, or a curtain that illuminates a room, or a smartphone screen that doubles in size, stretching like rubber.” At UCLA, for example, scientists have fabricated “an elastomeric polymer light-emitting device (EPLED)” that can be repeatedly stretched, folded, and twisted at room temperature while still remaining lit and holding its original shape. The material has a single layer of electro-luminescent polymer sandwiched between a pair of transparent elastic composite electrodes that are made of a network of silver nanowires inlaid into a rubbery polymer. (The EPLED is a type of polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell [PLEC] device. Research is also ongoing in the development of flexible versions of organic light-emitting diode [OLED] displays commonly found in today’s smartphones, but the UCLA team chose PLECs instead because they’re easier to fabricate and simpler to work with.) The developers stretched and re-stretched their PLEC display 1,000 times, extending it 30% beyond its original shape and size, and it still continued to work at a high efficiency. In another test to determine the material’s maximum stretch, the researchers found it could be stretched to more than twice its original size while still functioning. It can also be folded 180° and twisted in multiple directions. Qibing Pei, UCLA’s principal investigator on the project says confidently that “[W]e believe that fully stretchable interactive displays that are as thin as wallpaper will be achieved in the near future.” Roll up the news and take it with you? That may not be far off. Samsung is also working on a flexible screen. The company is mounting its display on silicone that can be bent in half 100,000 times (Samsung claims), yet suffer a loss of light intensity in the crease zone of just 6%—all but undetectable by the human eye. Think of a smartphone whose screen size could be doubled by simply unfolding it. And the technology can be adapted to simple lighting, too. Is this your next desk lamp?center_img Of course, as our electronics become flexible, so must their power supplies, especially in the case of mobile devices. How that power is delivered will depend on how the war between batteries and supercapacitors is ultimately resolved. But scientists are currently working on flexible versions of both. In early 2013, collaborating researchers from Northwestern and the University of Illinois unveiled the first stretchable lithium-ion battery. American Chemical Society To test the ink’s flexibility, the researchers folded the paper 1,000 times, even crumpling it up, and demonstrated that the ink maintained 80-90% of its conductivity. But perhaps the most exciting roles flexible electronics will be playing in the years to come are in the realm of medicine. Because the human body is always in motion, the design of wearable health monitors and implants must take that into account. Yong Xu of Wayne State University has pushed the research forward by inventing a method for fabricating high-performance and high-density semiconductor circuits, and bonding them to flexible substrates. “The ultimate goal is to develop flexible and stretchable systems integrated with electronics, sensors, microfluidics, and power sources, which will have a profound impact on personalized medicine, telemedicine, and health care delivery,” Xu says. Surgery could be transformed. Consider what happens today after a doctor operates to remove a tumor from a patient’s liver. Even after following up with radiation and/or chemotherapy, the surgeon can never be positive that the treatment was successful. “But,” says Tom Jackson, an engineering professor at Penn State, “suppose I could apply a flexible circuit to the liver and image the tissue. If we see a new malignancy, it could release a drug directly onto that spot, or heat up a section of the circuit to kill the remaining cancerous cells. And when we were done, the body would resorb the material. “What I want is something that matches the flexibility and thermal conductivity of the body,” and conventional silicon technology is too rigid and thermally conductive for work like that. Jackson is going to get what he wants. Yes, conventional silicon tech is inappropriate for many uses in and on the body. But might there be a new form of silicon that captures its stability, efficiency, and low cost, yet bends and stretches? Indeed there is, says John Rogers, a cutting-edge materials scientist at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Rogers’ team has found a way to trick silicon into a more malleable form. Rather than making transistors from conventional wafers, they slice the material into sheets several times thinner than a human hair. “At this scale,” Rogers says, “something that would otherwise be brittle is completely floppy … [in the way that] a 2-by-4 is rigid, but a sheet of paper is not—similar materials, just different thicknesses.” The applications he’s working on are truly mind-blowing. Here are just a few: Imagine a sensor array that can precisely mold to the shape of an organ. Start with the heart. Sensors made of a stretchable, lightweight material and embedded with electronics could wrap around a beating heart like a glove, providing real-time measurements of cardiac activity. The goal, Rogers says, is to detect early signs of arrhythmia and deliver coordinated voltages across the entire organ, rather than administering massive shocks at a few points, as current defibrillators do. Collaborators at Washington University in St. Louis have tested the device, which he calls an “artificial pericardium,” on rabbits and on human hearts removed from transplant recipients. Trials in live patients could be just around the corner. He and his colleagues have also created an electronic “second skin.” It’s a wireless circuit board less than a micron thick that can be stamped directly onto the skin and sealed with a spray-on bandage. The device could enable doctors to monitor a wide range of biological functions, including heart rate, skin temperature, muscle activity, and hydration, for starters—and it conforms so well to the shifting creases and troughs of human skin that it can stay on for up to two weeks before it is sloughed off. It can also send small electric currents to stimulate muscles as part of a physical therapy regimen. And its noninvasiveness makes it especially useful in neonatal care. Finally, Rogers is well on the way to developing Prof. Jackson’s desired resorbable devices. These “transient electronics,” as he calls them, could monitor and prevent infection at surgical sites, then melt away according to a set schedule of days or weeks. And—made up of ingredients found in antacids and vitamin pills—they’re harmless to the human body. During a talk at an electrical engineering conference, a skeptical colleague bet Rogers that he wouldn’t dare swallow one of his transient devices on stage. Rogers won that bet. The shift to flexible electronics is a trend that means a financial windfall for companies poised to cash in on it. One of them—our July recommendation—presently sits in the BIG TECH portfolio. This company makes equipment used to encapsulate organic light-emitting diodes, part of the process that enables electronics to be folded or rolled. As demand for flexible devices takes off, so too will demand for this company’s equipment. For access to this recommendation, simply sign up for a risk-free 90-day trial of BIG TECH.last_img read more

Platinums high came shortly after 8 am in Hong

first_img Platinum’s high came shortly after 8 a.m. in Hong Kong on their Wednesday morning—and it chopped ten bucks lower from there until the real selling began shortly before 2 p.m. Zurich time—and the same time as gold and silver got hit in London.  The HFT boyz peeled another ten bucks off the price going into the COMEX close—and it  traded ruler flat from here.  Platinum closed at $1,129 spot, down 19 bucks from Tuesday’s close. It was just about as bad for the silver equities.  They opened down as well—and crashed to their low ticks minutes after 10:30 a.m. EDT.  They barely moved off their lows after that, as Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed down 3.06 percent. Here’s the 5-minute gold tick chart courtesy of Brad Robertson.  Midnight EDT/noon in Hong Kong is the vertical gray line at the 22:00 MDT mark.  You can see that the price/volume action that really mattered occurred between 6:30 and 9:00 a.m. Mountain Daylight time on this chart, with the big volume spike happening once the London p.m. fix was in and the HFT boyz spun their algorithms.  The rest really doesn’t matter.  Don’t forget to add two hours for EDT—and the ‘click to enlarge’ feature is a must. The dollar index closed late on Tuesday afternoon in New York at 97.99—and made it as high as 98.10 in the early going in Far East trading on their Wednesday morning.  It began to slide from there, with the 97.43 low coming just after 10:15 a.m. BST in London.  The subsequent rally made it back to within a basis point or two of unchanged by 11:00 a.m. EDT—and it chopped sideways from there into the close.  The index finished the day at 98.06—up 7 basis points. As you can tell, there was absolute no correlation between the what the currencies were doing and what was going on in the precious metal market. Ditto for palladium, except the selling in that metal was pretty much done by 1 p.m. EDT—and it traded flat in the 5:15 p.m. close of electronic trading as well.  Palladium got smoked for 23 dollars—and closed at $753 spot. With only one exception, the silver chart was a carbon copy of the gold chart—and the HFT boyz really smacked silver at the gold fix.  The low in silver came minutes before 10:30 a.m. in New York.  Gold’s low came about thirty minutes later. The high and low were reported as $16.075 and $15.655 in the May contract. Silver finished the Wednesday trading session at $15.67 spot, down another 22 cents.  Net volume wasn’t overly heavy, which I found surprising, as it was only  26,000 contracts, a thousand contracts more than on Tuesday. The gold stocks opened down a bit—and kept right on going, with the lows coming just before 2 p.m. EDT.  After that they didn’t do much.  The HUI got hit for 3.63 percent. The CME Daily Delivery Report showed that zero gold and 1 lonely silver contract was posted for delivery within the COMEX-approved depositories on Friday. The CME Preliminary Report for the Wednesday trading session showed that gold open interest in April declined by 54 contracts—and that leaves 471 contracts still open.  Not surprisingly, the silver o.i. fell by the 150 contracts posted for delivery yesterday—and that will be delivered today.  There are 23 contracts still open in April. There were no reported changes in GLD—and as of 9:32 p.m. EDT yesterday evening, there were no reported changes in SLV, either. Over at Switzerland’s Zürcher Kantonalbank for the week ending Friday, April 17—they reported increases in both their gold and silver ETFs for a change.  In gold they added 15,832 troy ounces—and in silver it was 68,360 troy ounces. There was another sales report from the U.S. Mint yesterday.  They sold 3,500 troy ounces of gold eagles—1,000 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes—and 30,000 silver eagles. It was another very busy day in gold over at the COMEX-approved depositories on Tuesday, as 141,031 troy ounces were reported received—and only 100 troy ounces were shipped out.  Most of the gold deposited disappeared into the vaults of HSBC USA.  The link to that activity is here. Silver activity was also very decent, as 631,802 troy ounces were received—and 555,071 were shipped out.  A bit over half the silver that was shipped out came out of JPMorgan’s vault.  The link to that action is here. Over at the COMEX-approved gold depositories in Hong Kong on Tuesday, Brink’s, Inc. reported receiving 8,319 kilobars, but they also shipped out a chunky 14,759 kilobars.  That’s big movement, dear reader.  The link to that activity in troy ounces is here. I have the usual number of stories for a weekday column—and I’ll happily leave the final edit up to you. [Last] Wednesday, I commented that the COMEX is artificially setting the price of silver and gold by means of a purely private betting game (aka bucket shop) comprised exclusively of speculators with no real producer or consumer participation. I attempted to prove this by pointing out that the Managed Money category accounts for 90% of contract position change on both price declines and increases. Since Managed Money traders are defined by the CFTC and the exchange as being pure speculators (as opposed to legitimate hedgers) there can be little doubt that they are just that – speculators. And the same can be said of the financial institutions trading against the managed money traders; since no legitimate producers (miners) or users are involved in the game, the commercial traders are also nothing more than speculators. I hope you recognize that the 90% figure of all positioning is a very conservative estimate on my part, when it comes to typical managed money participation. In fact, the percentage is, at times, much greater than 100%. In recapping last week’s COT Report and compared to their commercial counterparties, the Managed Money traders in gold accounted for 160% of commercial positioning (7,600 contracts vs. 4,700 commercial contracts) and in silver, the managed money traders accounted for 130% of commercial positioning (8,600 contracts vs. 6,600 commercial net contracts). I’d like to see someone from the CFTC or the CME Group try to explain how this wasn’t proof of manipulation on its face, but neither appear to be forthcoming on any serious market matter. – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 18 April 2015 Another day—and more salami slicing—the same old, same old. Taking another look at the gold and silver charts, it’s easy to see that we still have 40 dollars or so to go in gold—and about 50 cents in silver at the most to get back to where we were about five weeks ago. Of course, it’s never the price that matters.  As Ted Butler continually points out, it’s the number of long contracts that JPMorgan et al can get the technical funds in the Managed Money category to sell—and then how much they can get them loaded up on the short side on top of that.  When those two numbers are reached in both gold and silver, the bottom will be in—and we’re not there yet. Here are the 6-month charts for all four precious metals, updated with yesterday’s damage. Another day—and more salami slicing—the same old, same old Despite the fact that the dollar index got smoked in Far East trading for most of their Wednesday session, the gold price didn’t react much to that fact, or wasn’t allowed to—you pick.  The gold price continued to chop a few dollars around either side of unchanged until shortly before 1 p.m. in London trading.  The HFT boyz showed up ten minutes after the COMEX open—and then finished the job once the London p.m. gold “fix” was in, with the low coming just minutes before the London close, which was 11:00 a.m. EDT.  The subsequent rally didn’t get far—and after the 1:30 p.m. COMEX close, it traded flat for the remainder of the Wednesday session. The high and low ticks were reported by the CME Group as $1,204.40 and $1,185.00 in the June contract. Gold finished the Wednesday trading day at $1,186.80 spot, down and even 15 dollars from Tuesday’s close.  Net volume was pretty decent at 139,000 contracts. Of course outside circumstance may intervene at some point—and we could get rallies regardless, but at the moment one must assume that nothing has changed in the short to medium term—and that “da boyz” and their algorithms are still the masters  of the precious metal market. And as I type this paragraph, the London open is about ten minutes away.  Gold hit a new low for this move down shortly before 10 a.m. Hong Kong time on their Thursday morning.  The metal rallied above unchanged for a while, but has begun to head lower in the last hour of trading.  The silver price hasn’t done much at all during Thursday trading in the Far East—and is basically unchanged from it’s Wednesday close in New York.   Platinum and palladium have been chopping around unchanged as well. Gold’s net volume is getting very close to the 20,000 contract mark—and 99.9 percent of it is in the current front month, so it’s all of the HFT variety.  Silver’s net volume is at the 2,400 contract mark, with very decent roll-over volume.  The dollar index is chopping higher—and is currently up 13 basis points. It’s unfortunate that yesterday’s trading volume won’t be included in tomorrow’s Commitment of Traders Report as there certainly was improvement in the Commercial net short positions in both silver and gold.  This would be especially true in gold, as JPMorgan et al closed it well below its 50-day moving average—and back below $1,200 spot. And as I send today’s effort out the door at 5:20 a.m. EDT, I see that gold and silver aren’t doing much, or aren’t being allowed to do much, although silver is up about a dime at the moment.  Both platinum and palladium set minor new lows for this move down—and are trading about unchanged. Gold’s net volume is at 29,500 contracts, which is pretty heavy for such tiny moves in the gold price, so it appears that whatever rally attempts are being made, the price is not being allowed to get far.  Silver’s net volume is around 4,500 contracts—and a decent amount is roll-overs out of the May contract.  The dollar index, which had been up earlier, is now down a hair. I’m done for another day.  It remains to be seen how the rest of the Thursday trading session turns out.  It appears that despite what the dollar index is doing, the precious metal prices are being totally controlled by JPMorgan et al in the COMEX futures market—and unless something comes out of left field, I expect that the current trend will continue. See you tomorrow, Integra’s Lamaque South Gold Project and Sigma-Lamaque Milling Complex and Mines are located directly east from the city of Val-d’Or along the prolific Abitibi Greenstone belt in the Province of Québec, Canada, approximately 550 km northwest of Montréal. Québec is rated one of the best mining jurisdictions in the world. Infrastructure, human resources and mining expertise are readily available. The Company’s primary focus is on production planning for its high-grade Lamaque South project. The Lamaque South property is divided into three clusters, the North, South and West cluster. The primary targets are the high-grade Parallel Zone in the North Cluster and the Triangle Zone in the South Cluster. The acquired Sigma Mill, located 1 kilometer from the Parallel Zone and 3 kilometers from the Triangle Zone, is a fully-permitted, 2,200 ton per day mill and tailings facility. The Sigma-Lamaque Mill and Mining Complex include the historic Sigma and Lamaque Mines which operated for 75 and 52 years respectively and produced more than 9 million ounces of gold in total. Please visit our website for more information.last_img read more

Molecular signatures reveal why women are more likely to die from glioblastoma

first_imgIt is our expectation that this study could have an immediate impact on the care of patients with glioblastoma and further research. The findings indicate we should be stratifying male and female glioblastoma into risk groups and evaluating the effectiveness of treatment in a sex-specific manner.”Dr. Joshua Rubin, Co-senior Author Giovanni Cancemi | ShutterstockThe team identified distinct molecular signatures in tumors taken from men and women that helped to explain the disparity in treatment and survival rates.The study suggests that tailoring treatments based on the molecular subtype of men and women’s tumors may improve patient outcome. In a study of adults with glioblastoma, Dr. Joshua Rubin and colleagues found that women responded better to treatment than men.To investigate why, they used standard MRI scans to measure tumor growth velocity, enabling them to derive a value for how quickly tumors were growing.As reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the team then pulled patients’ MRI scan and survival data from a cancer research database and assessed tumor growth velocity every two months among 40 males and 23 females who received standard chemo-radiation therapy after they had undergone surgery.”The males did not respond as well, and we wanted to understand why, so we looked at the underlying genetics of patients’ tumors,” says Rubin.The researchers tapped into The Cancer Genome Atlas and applied advanced statistical algorithms that would distinguish male- or female-specific gene expression patterns from such patterns that were shared among the male and female patients.They then looked at sex-specific gene expression to find molecular subtypes that would correspond with the differences seen in male and female survival.Co-senior author Jingqin Luo says: “We observed tremendous genetic sex differences in the tumors of glioblastoma patients that correlated with survival.”The team found that tumors were clustered into five subtypes in males and five in females. Females with tumors from one cluster survived just over three years compared with just over one year among females with tumors from any of the other four clusters.Similarly, men with tumors from one cluster survived just over 18 months compared with just over one year among men who had tumors from the other four clusters.The team also identified genetic pathways that correlated with the longest survival and they were very different in males compared with females, says Rubin. For example, survival among males was partially dependent on the regulation of cell division, suggesting that medication to block the cell cycle may be more effective in men.Among women, survival was affected by regulation of invasiveness, indicating that targeting integrin signaling may be the most effective approach. This tells us it might be better to separate males and females and examine their sex-specific genetic signatures.”Joshua Rubin, Co-senior Authorcenter_img By Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Jan 2 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)A study led by researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine has shed light on why more males than females develop and die from the deadly brain cancer, glioblastoma. SourceSex differences identified in deadly brain tumors.last_img read more

Exploring the factors around experience and management of pain in workplaces

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 25 2019A special issue of WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation looks at factors around the experience and management of pain in workplaces around the worldWorkers suffering from chronic pain takes an immense toll on both employees and employers. Whether the pain that individuals experience is physical or psychological, constant or intermittent, or caused by work conditions or brought to the job, its effect on their productivity and wellbeing is a huge problem. Not surprisingly, work and pain are the subjects of a growing body of research, as technological advances transform healthcare at the same time as they created new challenges.Understanding the interaction between work and pain is an important focus of WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation. WORK’s scope covers the entire occupation of work and presents evidence and best practices to help manage illnesses, injuries, and disabilities through interventions, rehabilitation, and treatment. To that end, WORK has published a special collection of seven new research articles on work and pain. In her editorial introducing this issue, Editor-in-Chief and Founding Editor Karen Jacobs noted that since 2008, WORK has published more than 20,000 research articles and reviews on the subject, which represents “more pain-related articles than any of the ‘recognized’ pain journals.”Each of the articles in the special issue looks at the interplay of work, stress, and pain across diverse job roles, industries, and geographic locations including the United States, Scotland, Iran, Thailand, Hong Kong, and Australia. Findings support the following conclusions: Two of the articles highlight challenges and opportunities that technology brings to the dynamic relationship of work and pain. Using one of today’s most essential business tools, a smartphone, puts users’ necks at risk when they make calls or send texts, according to Rose Boucaut, DEd, MPH, at the School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy) University of South Australia, iCAHE (International Centre for Allied Health Evidence), Adelaide, Australia. “Smartphone users typically bend their neck slightly forward when reading and writing text messages. They also sometimes bend or twist their neck sideways when speaking and put their upper body and legs in awkward positions. These postures put uneven pressure on the soft tissues around the spine and can lead to persistent discomfort,” she explained.Related StoriesBritish boys to receive HPV jabsSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyHow a simple MRI scan can help patients with anginaThis observation is based on the results of a study on which she collaborated with a team of investigators led by Suwalee Namwongsa, PhD, Research Center in Back, Neck, Other Joint Pain, and Human Performance (BNOJPH), and School of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University in Thailand. They conducted a cross-sectional survey study of 779 Thai university students and found that musculoskeletal disorders are more common among the students who used smartphones for five or more hours a day (other significant factors included smoking and an insufficient amount of exercise). Nearly a third of the students reported neck pain, more than a quarter of them reported shoulder pain, and a fifth either upper back pain or wrist/hand pain. Significantly more (71%) of the women in the study group experienced musculoskeletal pain than men (28%).”It is doubtful whether people experiencing back and neck pain, especially young people, are aware that it could be the result of excessive smartphone use. Health practitioners need to educate their patients about safe postures and curtailing time spent using smartphones to help prevent these issues,” said Dr. Namwongsa. She added that many smartphone companies notify customers of the average time they spend daily on their phones, feedback that “may help users connect neck discomfort with smartphone use and encourage them to be mindful of their posture and time on the phone. In addition, healthcare providers can develop preventive initiatives that discourage flexed necks and other problematic positions (as well as smoking).”Another featured article in the collection zeroes in on how a technology can be fine-tuned to better manage lower back pain, a chronic condition that causes presenteeism and impedes workplace performance. This study investigated the effects of pivotal whole body vibration on an individual’s proprioception (awareness of the body’s positions and movements), which has potential application in treating musculoskeletal conditions such as lower back pain.”Our findings demonstrate that five minutes of pivotal whole body vibration (18Hz, 6mm amplitude) can significantly improve spinal proprioception including body posture, lumbar repositioning ability, maximum reaching distance, and lumbopelvic coordination in healthy individuals,” said lead investigator Daniel H.K. Chow, PhD, Department of Health & Physical Education, The Education University of Hong Kong, Tai Po, Hong Kong. He explained that “the effects do not differ when the participants are seated or standing. Moreover, the choice of frequency and amplitude of whole body vibration protocol is critical as vibration could produce very different responses, either beneficial or dangerous. This a valuable finding as it could potentially lead to a treatment for lower back pain.” Higher levels of presenteeism (being present at work in body but not mind) are associated with lower back pain. Repetitive work, heavy lifting, and limited rest increase discomfort from common musculoskeletal conditions. Workers (especially older individuals) often fail to disclose their chronic knee pain for fear of losing their jobs. Job stress is linked to chronic pain, with psychological symptoms intensifying physical ones. Interestingly, that study noted that employees without chronic pain sometimes begin to think catastrophically about physical pain as their stress level ramps up. Female allied health professionals and those with chronic musculoskeletal conditions are more susceptible to depression and anxiety as a result of job stress.center_img Source:https://www.iospress.nl/last_img read more

Innovative membrane offers a viable solution for periodontitis

first_img Source:http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/new-class-membranes-regenerate-tissue-bone-periodontitis Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 22 2019Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. Recent studies have shown that periodontitis could also increase risk of heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.A team of UCLA researchers has developed methods that may lead to more effective and reliable therapy for periodontal disease — ones that promote gum tissue and bone regeneration with biological and mechanical features that can be adjusted based on treatment needs. The study is published online in ACS Nano.Periodontitis is a chronic, destructive disease that inflames the gums surrounding the tooth and eventually degrades the structure holding the tooth in place, forming infected pockets leading to bone and tooth loss. Current treatments include infection-fighting methods; application of molecules that promote tissue growth, also known as growth factors; and guided tissue regeneration, which is considered the optimal standard of care for the treatment of periodontitis.Guided tissue regeneration, in the case of periodontitis, involves the use of a membrane or thin film that is surgically placed between the inflamed gum and the tooth. Membranes, which come in non-biodegradable and biodegradable forms, are meant to act not only as barriers between the infection and the gums, but also as a delivery system for drugs, antibiotics and growth factors to the gum tissue.Unfortunately, results from guided tissue regeneration are inconsistent. Current membranes lack the ability to regenerate gum tissue directly and aren’t able to maintain their structure and stability when placed in the mouth. The membrane also can’t support prolonged drug delivery, which is necessary to help heal infected gum tissue. For non-biodegradable membranes, multiple surgeries are needed to remove the membrane after any drugs have been released — compromising the healing process.”Given the current disadvantages with guided tissue regeneration, we saw the need to develop a new class of membranes, which have tissue and bone regeneration properties along with a flexible coating that can adhere to a range of biological surfaces,” said Dr. Alireza Moshaverinia, lead author of the study and assistant professor of prosthodontics at the UCLA School of Dentistry. “We’ve also figured out a way to prolong the drug delivery timeline, which is key for effective wound healing.”The team started with an FDA-approved polymer — a large-scale synthetic molecule commonly used in biomedical applications. Because the polymer’s surface isn’t suitable for cell adhesion in periodontal treatment, the researchers introduced a polydopamine coating — a polymer that has excellent adhesive properties and can attach to surfaces in wet conditions. The other benefit of using such a coating is that it speeds up bone regeneration by promoting mineralization of hydroxyapatite, which is the mineral that makes up tooth enamel and bone.Related Stories’Text neck’ may be causing bone spurs in young peopleResearchers describe how prostate cancer cells develop ability to mimic osteoblastsEngineered stem cells offer new treatment for metastatic bone cancerAfter identifying an optimal combination for their new membrane, the researchers used electrospinning to bond the polymer with the polydopamine coating. Electrospinning is a production method that simultaneously spins two substances at a rapid speed with positive and negative charges, and fuses them together to create one substance. To improve their new membrane’s surface and structural characteristics, the researchers used metal mesh templates in conjunction with the electrospinning to create different patterns, or micro-patterning, similar to the surface of gauze or a waffle.”By creating a micro pattern on the surface of the membrane, we are now able to localize cell adhesion and to manipulate the membrane’s structure,” said co-lead author Paul Weiss, UC presidential chair and distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, bioengineering, and materials science and engineering at UCLA. “We were able to mimic the complex structure of periodontal tissue and, when placed, our membrane complements the correct biological function on each side.”To test the safety and efficiency of their new membrane, the researchers injected rat models with gingival-derived human stem cells and human periodontal ligament stem cells. After eight weeks of evaluating the degradation of the membranes and the tissue’s response, they observed that the patterned, polydopamine-coated polymer membrane had higher levels of bone gain when compared to models with no membrane or a membrane with no coating.In order to suit a wide range of medical and dental applications, the researchers also figured out a way to adjust the speed at which their membranes degraded when inserted in their models. They did this by adding and subtracting different oxidative agents or using lighter polymer bases before going through the electrospinning process. The ability to turn the degradation rates up or down helped the researchers control the timing of the delivery of drugs to the desired areas.”We’ve determined that our membranes were able to slow down periodontal infection, promote bone and tissue regeneration, and stay in place long enough to prolong the delivery of useful drugs,” Moshaverinia said. “We see this application expanding beyond periodontitis treatment to other areas needing expedited wound healing and prolonged drug delivery therapeutics.”The researchers’ next steps are to evaluate whether their membranes can deliver cells with growth factors in the presence or absence of stem cells.last_img read more

Walking downhill after meals can reduce bone resorption in postmenopausal women with

first_img Source:https://www.endocrine.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 25 2019Walking downhill after eating can reduce bone resorption, the process in which old bone is broken down and removed from the body, in postmenopausal women with diabetes, according to research to be presented Sunday, March 24 at ENDO 2019, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in New Orleans, La. Walking uphill does not have the same benefit, the study found.All women are at risk of bone loss after menopause because of a loss of estrogen. Postmenopausal women with diabetes experience more broken bones than postmenopausal women who do not have the condition. “We wanted to see whether eating before or after meals, and walking downhill or uphill, had an effect on markers of bone formation and resorption in these women,” said lead researcher Katarina T. Borer, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich.Related StoriesDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesLong-term follow-up of childhood cancer survivors is essential to maintain bone healthCommon antibacterial agent may be bad news for bone healthThe researchers studied 15 postmenopausal women with diabetes in two of five day-long experiments. One group did not exercise. The remaining groups spent 40 minutes exercising on either an uphill or downhill treadmill. The participants exercised either an hour before or an hour after eating each of two daily meals.The women’s blood was measured hourly to look for markers of bone formation and resorption. Their levels of glucose and insulin were also measured. The women wore special shoe insoles to measure the impact of their walking. The study found the most effective way to reduce the breakdown of the protein collagen, which helps form bone, was to walk downhill after eating.”Exercising after eating may help nutrients from the food get absorbed into the bloodstream,” Borer said. “The best exercise for your bones is the weight-bearing kind, which forces you to work against gravity. When you walk downhill, the pull of gravity is greater.”Borer noted that an easy way to walk downhill is to walk down stairs. While most treadmills are only adjustable upwards, not downwards, she said it may be possible to put cement blocks under the back of the treadmill to tilt it downwards.In the future, postmenopausal women with diabetes might be able to combine exercising after meals with walking downhill to reduce their need for osteoporosis medication, Borer said.”Before we recommend this, studies would need to be done to determine exactly how much bone mineral they are losing and how much exercise must be done to compensate for reducing the medication,” she said.last_img read more

Revolutionary treatment uses fat cells to correct vaginal and postmenopausal problems

first_imgApr 3 2019For the first time ever British women are being offered a revolutionary new treatment to correct a broad range of vaginal, gynecological and post-menopausal related problems. The Regenerative Woman Clinic opens its doors this April 2019.More than 50%* of menopausal women in the UK say their life has been impacted negatively with little or no help offered in most communities. 294* million women worldwide suffer with vaginal atrophy as a result of the menopause and 75%* go untreated. For the first time ever British women are now being offered a revolutionary and natural new treatment to correct a broad range of vaginal, gynecological and post-menopausal related problems.The Regenerative Woman Clinic provides pioneering Lipogems® technology treatment for vaginal atrophy and a host of other conditions. Mesenchmyal Stem Cells (MSCs) present in fat tissue are harvested and once prepared the cells are injected into areas of the vagina and vulva where they stimulate healthy cell growth and repair alleviating common symptoms such as dryness, soreness, burning sensations and discomfort during intercourse.The clinic has assembled a team of specialist gynecological Harley Street consultants, each one an expert in their own field of gynecology including; Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsWithout the use of synthetic chemicals or replacements, Lipogems® technology rejuvenates the vagina, and is a natural solution helping to restore vaginal health; lifting the physical and emotional burden women often feel when struggling with their vaginal health.Lipogems® technology can be used for the effective treatment of vaginal atrophy, dryness, soreness and pain during sex. For each woman the experience of the menopause is extremely personal however, it is estimated that over 40% of menopausal women will experience symptoms related to vaginal atrophy. It is particularly helpful for multiple uses for other conditions such as Lichen sclerosis, Lichen Planus, Lichen simplex, stress incontinence, tearing as a result of birth-trauma and problems caused by oestrogen deficiency. The orthopaedic sister clinic under the leadership of Professor Adrian Wilson has successfully conducted thousands of Lipogems® treatments on hips, knees, ankles and shoulders contributing to a global total of more than 30,000 Lipogems® procedures worldwide.Miss Jeannie Yoon, says: We are very excited about the potential of this technique and the positive impact that it can bring to women’s lives. I see women everyday with diverse problems and needs. We believe that this treatment may have superior longevity compared to other alternatives. Lipogems offers a more natural alternative to women who want or need to avoid hormonal treatment, for example, those women who have had cancer or are at risk of getting cancer. This will revolutionize many women’s lives.”center_img Miss Shoreh Beski, Consultant Obstetrician & Gynecologist with 25 years’ experience in the private health sector and NHS with a special interest in sub fertility, regenerative medicine and high risk obstetrics Miss Jeannie Yoon, Consultant Obstetrician & Gynecologist having worked at St Thomas’, Queen Charlotte’s, Chelsea & Westminster and the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. Miss Yoon has specialist knowledge of abnormal smears and colposcopy, having spent three years at the Royal Marsden Hospital as the Cancer Research Campaign Fellow and is a recognized BMS (British Menopause Society) specialist Dr Richard Smith, Consultant Gynecologist, was a Senior Lecturer at Charing Cross & Westminster School of Medicine and thereafter Consultant and Director of Gynaecology at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital. He is the First editor of the book, Gynecologic Oncology and the author Women’s Cancers: Pathways to Healing Dr. Joseph Aquilina, Consultant Obstetrician & Gyneologist, is a Consultant at St.Bartholomew’s and Royal London Hospitals and an Honorary Senior Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London. His work has been recognized as a preceptor for training in gynecological scanning by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and has been the Editor for Women’s Health Section of Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology Source:https://www.theregenerativewomanclinic.co.uk/last_img read more

New resistance mechanism that prevent formation of blood vessels

first_imgThe antibody of the study had the target Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D). Semaphorins are a large and diverse family of proteins from outside the cells, involved in cell signaling, and are essential for the development and maintenance of many organs and tissues. Some of them have implications for angiogenesis and cancer progression. Its name comes from the Greek semaphero, that means “bearer of signals”.Related StoriesMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerSema4D is a protein that is expressed predominantly in the membrane of solid tumors, in cancers such as breast, prostate and colon cancer. This protein is also found in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which are immune cells that play an important role in tumor invasion, tumor formation and in metastasis. The 4D Semaphorin is also related to the formation of blood vessels.Faced with this new situation, the researchers looked for which could be the differential factor from what was known to date, and they realized that there was a large presence of macrophages. They saw that, in the presence of the anti-Sema4D antibody, the macrophages secreted a molecule named SDF1, which causes the tumor cells to migrate more: they present more motility and more invasion.These tests were done in transgenic mice models and what was observed was an increased survival of animals in the short term. In the long term, however, an unwanted effect (metastasis) was generated, significantly worsening the condition of the mice.”Now that we know the new mechanism, we can begin to look for a way to inhibit it – for example, avoiding secretion of SDF1- and, in this way, to give an alternative to only have the positive effects of the antibody” explains Dr. Oriol Casanovas. He adds that “depending on each case, treatments could be carried out simultaneously with two drugs at the same time”.”What we propose is that the immune system is also taken into account when doing some therapies, because now we know that there may be the possibility of activating it with some drugs”, concludes Dr. Iratxe Zuazo. Source:IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research InstituteJournal reference:Zuazo, I. et al. (2019) Anti-tumor effects of anti-Semaphorin 4D antibody unravel a novel pro-invasive mechanism of vascular targeting agents. Cancer Research. doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-18-3436 In the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) it had been described that the conditions of low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in the tumor were the cause of malignization of the tumor cells that became more aggressive and migrated, but our samples did not present hypoxia conditions and we still had this effect”.Dr Iratxe Zuazo, IDIBELL The mechanism does not activate the reduction of oxygen in the cells of the tumor, contrary to what common drugs, called anti-angiogenic, usually cause. In response to treatment, the immune cells of the tumor act as elements that make the tumor malignant. Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the ProCure Program of the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) published today at Cancer Research a study describing a new mechanism in cancer that turns cells into malignant cells and contradicts what had been published so far about drug resistance that prevent the formation of blood vessels (anti-angiogenics). The research has been led by Dr. Oriol Casanovas, from the group of Tumor Angiogenesis of the IDIBELL, and the Dr Iratxe Zuazo has participated as one of the first authors.In the search for alternative factors to fight cancer, antibody development as a therapeutic route is one of them. Antibodies can have an anti-tumor effect, preventing tumors from developing properly. In this study, scientists observed that one of these antibodies led to similar effects to those known for traditional antiangiogenic medications. However, the initial response to treatment culminated in the appearance of long-term resistance and malignancy through a mechanism unknown to date. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 3 2019Researchers at IDIBELL-ICO describe a new resistance mechanism to therapies that prevent the formation of blood vesselslast_img read more

Scientists developing technology for water purification by electric discharges

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain Provided by Estonian Research Council Explore further The environment around us is becoming increasingly polluted. This includes one of our most precious natural resources—water. Clean water is essential to human survival. Due to increased pollution, water treatment methods are becoming increasingly important as well. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Yi-Xian Wang et al, Surfactant and non-surfactant radical scavengers in aqueous reactions induced by pulsed corona discharge treatment, Journal of Electrostatics (2019). DOI: 10.1016/j.elstat.2019.03.001 As regards scientifically proven methods, the plasma water treatment by electrical discharge method is ousting the water chlorination method applied over the last 100 years.An international research group led by Professor at the TalTech Department of Material and Environmental Technology Sergei Preis published a scientific article “Surfactant and non-surfactant radical scavengers in aqueous reactions induced by pulsed corona discharge treatment” on this subject in the Journal of Electrostatics.Professor Sergei Preis says, “Use of chlorine for water treatment was completely revolutionary 100 years ago, eliminating pathogenic bacteria and viruses found in drinking water and thereby saving numerous human lives. Indeed, chlorine has so far been an inexpensive and efficient water disinfectant, killing bacteria hazardous to humans. However, the drawback is its side effect caused by the inevitable exposure of chlorine to dissolved organic substances, mostly humic substances (dead plant matter) and various extracellular metabolites. Unfortunately, upon such exposure chlorine will produce carcinogenic, i.e. cancer-causing substances.”In order to reduce the risk of cancer, some European countries (such as the Netherlands, Finland, Denmark) have introduced more radical pipeline maintenance measures (i.e. regular pipeline inspection and renewal). In this case chlorine need not be added to domestic water, but unfortunately such water is not 100 percent drinkable.A more efficient, but several times more expensive water treatment method is ozonation. However, ozone water treatment is considered to be a privilege of larger and wealthier countries (e.g. the USA, Switzerland, France) and only a very small proportion of ozone-treated drinking water can be produced worldwide.”As a result of the last five years of research, our research team has developed a reliable novel, plasma water treatment by electrical discharge method. In this method, water is showered between electrodes with discharge pulses of voltage pulse amplitude of 18-20 kV. By this method we can produce drinking water as suitable for consumption as the one produced by ozonation. No carcinogens are produced and the process is three times less expensive,” Sergei Preis says. Citation: Scientists developing technology for water purification by electric discharges (2019, April 17) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-scientists-technology-purification-electric-discharges.html Researchers develop a method to detoxify water with chlorine and ultraviolet radiationlast_img read more