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Murkowski Questions FEMA Leadership On Earthquake Recovery Efforts

first_imgIn response, Gaynor acknowledged the issues outlined by Murkowski and agreed that the process at times can be complex. Murkowski: “You indicate in your testimony, which I appreciate, that you’re seeking to reduce the complexity of FEMA to promote simpler less complex processes to streamline it. And that’s good, but how do we let folks know that disaster victims can have confidence in this program that is being administered and is it being administered as we intended it to?” Murkowski touched on the potential flaws within FEMA’s Individual Assistance Program process and questioned Gaynor on how to ensure disaster victims can be confident in FEMA’s disaster recovery efforts. Gaynor stated that he was committed to making adjustments to the program to try to deliver maximum disaster relief and assistance to Alaskans in need. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享During a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security a review was conducted of FEMA’s FY2020 Budget Request. During the hearing, U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) raised Alaska specific concerns to Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Acting Administrator Peter Gaynor. Murkowski: “Part of the problem is that it seems this individual assistance program has kind of a black box reputation. Nobody really knows what is eligible for a home repair award. No one knows if inspectors are consistent. The specific criteria that inspectors use isn’t readily available. Appeal decisions aren’t published.” Senator Murkowski highlighted the difficulties that Alaskans are facing as they seek assistance from FEMA following the 7.1 magnitude earthquake that occurred in Alaska on November 30, 2018.last_img read more

Android phones can be security keys now

first_img Mobile Security 2 Share your voice A physical security key on top of an Android phone. Josh Miller/CNET Security keys are an effective way to keep your accounts secure from hackers, but they suffer from a major challenge: They’re inconvenient.Not a lot of people want to buy and carry an extra key or Bluetooth fob just for logging in — which is why most two-factor authentication is done through text messages, even though it’s less secure. Up to 90% of Gmail users don’t even use 2FA, a Google software engineer revealed in 2018. Convenience is a big hurdle, and Google is hoping to solve that by making your phone the security key. It’ll have the same functionalities as a physical security key but won’t require you to carry an extra device to keep your accounts safe. That means that like a security key, your phone will warn you if an imposter website is trying to steal your password. Unlike using SMS or authenticator codes for logging in, security keys have to verify that the website you’re logging in on is legitimate. The updated security feature is coming only to Android devices versions 7 and up, which account for about 50% of all active users, according to Google’s distribution board. For now, it’s working only on Google’s Chrome browser and with Google accounts, but the company expects to expand availability. “This is a natural evolution of the standard. Just as some security keys only worked with Chrome initially and moved to other browsers, we’re seeing the same thing happening here,” said Christiaan Brand, a Google product manager for identity and security. You can set up the security key on your phone by going to your settings on Google and selecting 2-Step Verification. From there, you need to click on Add a Security Key and choose your phone as a device. School of phishPhishing attacks are common and often hard to spot, fooling even seasoned politicians. Security keys help prevent hackers from getting into your accounts because even if your password were stolen, an attacker would have to have the physical key to log in. “We’re solving the problem of someone thousands of miles away trying to steal your password,” said Sam Srinivas, Google Cloud’s product management director. “With this, someone has to be within 100 feet of you to try to attack you.” When Google first released its own Titan Key, it cost $50 for a set, and Brand said the company was hoping to eventually drive the cost down to less than $10. 07-titan-keyLast year, Google released its own Titan Security Key in both a USB and Bluetooth version. Sarah Tew/CNET By turning Android devices into security keys, Google is essentially giving them out for free. That much coverage could make it easier for more people to start using security keys, said Conor Gilsenan, a security researcher at All Things Auth.Over Christmas, the security expert said, he bought his family members security keys, but it took more than two hours to set up all these devices. “This is such a big deal,” Gilsenan said. “Being able to utilize the phone that you already have removes an entire barrier to better forms of two-factor authentication for the average internet user.”Brand said the phone security keys meet the FIDO authentication standard, which means any websites allowing for that standard will work with your phone as a security key. That includes websites like Facebook, Twitter and GitHub. Convenience is keyBrand is hoping the launch will convince other pages to accept phones as security keys.The technology works by connecting your phone and your computer’s Bluetooth when you’re logging in on a Google account. You’ll be prompted with a message on your phone to verify the log-in once they’re connected. While they’re using Bluetooth to communicate, the two devices don’t have to pair with each other, Brand said.”We devised a new standard on top of Bluetooth to make sure that these don’t need to pair,” he explained.There have been criticisms of using Bluetooth in security keys, because the wireless protocol could be open to security vulnerabilities. When Google announced its Bluetooth security fob last year, Yubico CEO Stina Ehrensvard released a statement saying Bluetooth didn’t have the same security standards as NFC and USB.Brand said Google had the capability to let your phone function as a security key through a USB cable but decided against it. “We’ve done user studies, and asking a user to have a cable ready that’ll fit both their devices almost takes away all the convenience of using their phone,” he said. Still, even with all the convenience of phones, Brand and Srinivas recommend having a second, backup USB key. That way, if you ever lose your phone or the battery’s dead, you can still log in. Now that half of all Android devices can function as security keys, the new challenge will be getting people to actually use them that way. Security keys have a lower adoption rate than 2FA as a whole, but the convenience will likely draw more people to better protect their accounts. “You don’t have to plug it in, and you don’t have to buy a new device, since you already have the phone,” Gilsenan said. “The bigger challenge is communicating to people that they actually need 2FA.” Tags Comments Googlelast_img read more

Music for the soul

first_imgThe national Capital hosted a musical evening in association with Unicef to raise funds for Nepal quake victims on May 24.Bands like Beatitudes, Ghetto Children, Noida School of Rock, Techtronics, Project Rigden and others performed at the event which was held at Dzukou Tribal Kitchen, Hauz Khas Village.“Nepal has always been close to my heart and many other Nepalese like me. The only purpose of this charity is to help rebuild Nepal and support its people, who need more help with each passing day,” said event organiser Shweta Pradhan, a Nepali migrant, who now lives in India, to media persons. Pradhan, like other Nepalese living in India, was moved by the pain and suffering of her people after multiple tremors and aftershocks shook the Himalayan nation, killing over 8,000 people and leaving over 10,000 injured. The amount collected was sent to the UNICEF.last_img read more